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get fancy: knotted braid

get fancy: knotted braid

With the warmer weather creeping up on us one sunshine-filled day at a time, it's the season for perfecting an out-of-the-face up do that will keep pesky hair off sticky faces and necks.

With the warmer weather creeping up on us one sunshine-filled day at a time, it's the season for perfecting an out-of-the-face up do that will keep pesky hair off sticky faces and necks. Here's an idea: get your fingers working and learn to work this knotted braid into your locks. As cute as a basket-toting Heidi, it can work for frolicking casually during the day or zhuush-ing yourself up at night.

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TOOLS:

mousse
thin comb
small hair ties
bobby pins

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Start off with fresh hair that has had mousse blow dried through. Comb in a nice straight side part to create your knot.

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2. Separate a small section at the front of your hairline that's about 1 inch wide, then split that in two. Take the portion of hair on the left side and tie that under the right side to create a loose knot – a little like tying up your shoelaces. Then grab the next section underneath your first knot and bring it together with the rest. Create another knot.

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3. Keep repeating the process all the way down to the nape of your neck to form a braid.

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4. Use a small elastic band to finish off about half-way down the length of your ear.

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5. Split the remaining loose hair in half and slip the bottom section into a ponytail. Pin underneath your knot braid.

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6. Start rolling both hanging sections into a tight twist, all the way to the bottom of the hair.

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7. Twist both sections into a small bun, ensuring you have some nice loose pieces poking out for a more relaxed look.

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And you're done! Step outside into the heat and gusty winds knowing that your locks will stay in place, and looks mighty cute while you're at it.

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The pretty piccies of model Hester Thompson-Brown were snapped by Kat Soutar. Tutorial is by Dana Leviston and Bernice Mansfield.