exclusive frankie diy - masking fluid card fun

Friday, 07 December 2012 14:00 by  anabela piersol

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I am not much of an illustrator, but with a few simple supplies, I thought I could make some cute holiday cards. I used masking fluid for watercolours, which is a type of rubber that, when applied, will preserve the area underneath, leaving it paper-coloured even if a watercolour wash is applied over the top.

To make these cards, I used:

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MATERIALS

Watercolour paints

Masking fluid

Watercolour paper or thick card stock with a nice 'tooth' to absorb the paint

A variety of brushes

A pencil

An eraser

Jar of water to clean off brushes

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INSTRUCTIONS

1. To begin, lightly draw your design with pencil onto the paper (or, if you're confident enough, freehand your design with masking fluid).

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2. Carefully apply the masking fluid with a brush, making sure to rinse your brush thoroughly afterwards (the fluid can really gum up your brushes!)

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3. Allow it to dry completely. I made a few different designs, from cursive text to square gift boxes with patterns on them.

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4. Once the masking fluid is dry, apply a watercolour wash over the top. This is my favourite part of the process. I really love applying gradient washes, which is done by starting with a layer of colour and then diluting the paint with water before the next couple of applications.

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5. For some of the other designs, the masking fluid helped me keep the design limited to a particular area; for example, I was able to paint square gift boxes without making a big mess. Then allow the watercolour to dry completely.

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6. Once the paint is completely dry, take your eraser and use it to "pick up" the fluid.

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7. You can either erase the fluid very carefully and gently, or you can use the eraser to pull the rubber off your paper to reveal your completed design.

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8. Just for fun, I expanded my mini line of holiday cards with a few other simple supplies. Have a play around!

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